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BLM Year of Purpose

Family Communication

Black Villages - There are lots of different kinds of families: What makes a family is that it's people who take care of each other; those people might be related or maybe they choose to be family together and to take care of each other. Sometimes, when it's lots of families together, it can be called a village.

This month we continue our commitment to the Black Lives Matter at School Year of Purpose by discussing the principle Black villages, celebrating Black Radical Educator Day, and specifically the work of Septima Clark. At Hazel Wolf we collectively care for one another and continue to create a supportive community. 

Principle Definitions

Black Villages: We are committed to disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, and especially “our” children to the degree that mothers, parents and children are comfortable.

Black Villages is the disruption of Western nuclear family dynamics and a return to the “collective village” that takes care of each other.

Kid Friendly: “There are lots of different kinds of families; what makes a family is that it’s people who take care of each other; those people might be related, or maybe they choose to be family together and to take care of each other. Sometimes, when it’s lots of families together, it can be called a village.”

Possible Vocabulary

  • Community  Village  Nuclear Family 

Lesson Plans

Books

  • How Many Stars in the Sky? by Lenny Hort and James Ransome
  • Lola Loves Stories by Anna McQuinn
  • Lola Plants a Garden by Anna McQuinn
  • Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn
  • These Hands by Margaret H. Mason
  • Do Like Kyla by Angela Johnson
  • The Leaving Morning by Angela Johnson
  • Daddy Calls Me Man by Angela Johnson
  • When I’m Old With You by Angela Johnson
  • Joshua’s Night Whispers by Angela Johnson
  • Drum Dream Girl by Margarita Engle
  • Locs Like Mine by Temeka Sherelle Parker
  • Young Cornrows Callin Out the Moon by Ruth Forman
  • No Mirrors in My Nanas House by Ysaye Barnwell
  • Please, Baby, Please by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee
  • David’s Drawings by Cathryn Falwell
  • Charlie Parker Played Beebop by Chris Rashka
  • This Jazz Man by Karen Ehhardt
  • What A Beautiful World by Ashley Bryan
  • My Daddy and I by Eloise Greenfield
  • This Is The Rope by Jacqueline Woodson
  • Faraway Home by Jane Kurtz
  • A Chair for My Mother by Vera Williams
Black Women

There are some people who think that women are less important than men. We know that all people are important and have the right to be safe and talk about their own feelings.

Black Women, Black Families, and Diversity

Black Lives Matter at School

*check back regularly, they are updating constantly!

Important Dates 

June 5, Breonna Taylor’s Birthday–Day to call for justice for Breonna and uplift the #SayHerName movement  

Juneteenth: Education for Liberation day–A day to celebrate the struggle that brought down slavery and reflects on what must be done to win Black liberation  

Last day of School, Reflection Day: reflect on your year of antiracist teaching. Possibly in groups. 

  • 6/5 Breonna Taylor’s Birthday 
  • 6/9 PLC time to work on year of purpose 
  • 6/16  HWK8 student assembly: #SayHerName, and Education for Liberation 
  • 6/18 Day of Reflection: review all 13 principles 
  • 6/19 Juneteenth 

Family Communication 

This month we continue our commitment to the Black Lives Matter at School Year of Purpose by discussing the principles Black women, Black families, and diversity. We also uplift the #SayHerName movement and remember Breonna Taylor on her birthday, June 5th, along with celebrating and remembering Juneteenth. During our last month of school together, we reflect on our year of purpose and the 13 principles.  

Principle Definitions 

Black Women: We are committed to building a Black women affirming space free from sexism, misogyny, and male‐centeredness. 

Black Women is the building of women-centered spaces free from sexism, misogyny, and male-centeredness.   

Kid Friendly: “There are some people who think that women are less important than men.  We know that all people are important and have the right to be safe and talk about their own feelings.” 

Black Families: We are committed to making our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We are committed to dismantling the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” that require them to mother in private even as they participate in justice work. 

Black Families creates a space that is family friendly and free from patriarchal practices.   

Kid Friendly: “There are lots of different kinds of families; what makes a family is that it’s people who take care of each other.  It’s important to make sure that all families feel welcome.” 

Diversity: We are committed to acknowledging, respecting, and celebrating difference(s) and commonalities. 

Diversity is the celebration and acknowledgment of differences and commonalities across cultures.   

Kid Friendly: “Different people do different things and have different feelings.  It’s so important that we have lots of different kinds of people in our community and that everyone feels safe.  Another way to say that is diversity.” 

Possible Vocabulary 

  • Sexism Misogyny Family Patriarchy 

Lesson Plans 

 Articles 

Books 

  • Her Stories by Virginia Hamilton 
  • John Henry by Julius Lester 
  • We Are the Ship : The Story of Negro League Baseball by Kadir Nelson 
  • Grace For President by Kelly S. Dipucchio 
  • Meet Danitra Brown by Nikki Grimes 
  • Of Thee I Sing by Barack Obama 
  • I Like My Hair by Natasha Anastasia Tarpley 
  • Black All Around by Patricia Hubbel 
  • Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters by John Steptoe 
  • Keep Climbing, Girl by Beah E Richards 
  • Little Melba and Her Big Trombone by Katheryn Russell Brown 
  • Something Beautiful by Renee Watson 
  • Fly High! by Louise Borden 
  • Firebird by Misty Copeland 

Important Dates

Black Families - There are lots of different kinds of families; what makes a family is that it's people who take care of each other. It's important to make sure that all families feel welcome.

During National Library Week, we seek to center the classic contributions of Black Writers and artists across the generations: Zora Neale Huston, Faith Ringgold, Alma Thomas, Augusta Savage, Jasmine Mans. How are the themes and radical vision that they brought to their art reflected in your classrooms and communities? How can young people extend on these legacies? 

  •  4/4-4/10 National Library Week 
  • 4/14 PLC time to work on year of purpose 
  • 4/28  HWK8 student assembly: National Library Week- Black Writers

 Family Communication 

This month we continue our commitment to the Black Lives Matter at School Year of Purpose by discussing the principle intergenerational and celebrating the work of black writers throughout the generations. At Hazel Wolf we foster an intergenerational and communal network free from ageism. We believe that all people, regardless of age, have the capacity to lead and learn. As educators we value the contributions and knowledge from our students and their ancestors. 

Principle Definitions 

Intergenerational: We are committed to fostering an intergenerational and communal network free from ageism. We believe that all people, regardless of age, show up with capacity to lead and learn. 

Intergenerational is a space free from ageism where we can learn from each other. 

Kid Friendly: “It’s important that we have spaces where people of different ages can come together and learn from each other. Another way to say that is intergenerational.” 

Possible Vocabulary 

FamilyAncestors   RelativesGenerationCommunityAgeism

 Lesson Plans 

Books 

  • How Many Stars in the Sky? by Lenny Hort and James Ransome 
  • Lola Loves Stories by Anna McQuinn 
  • Lola Plants a Garden by Anna McQuinn 
  • Lola at the Library by Anna McQuinn 
  • These Hands by Margaret H. Mason 
  • Do Like Kyla by Angela Johnson 
  • The Leaving Morning by Angela Johnson 
  • Daddy Calls Me Man by Angela Johnson 
  • When I’m Old With You by Angela Johnson 
  • Joshua’s Night Whispers by Angela Johnson 
  • Drum Dream Girl by Margarita Engle 
  • Locs Like Mine by Temeka Sherelle Parker 
  • Young Cornrows Callin Out the Moon by Ruth Forman 
  • No Mirrors in My Nanas House by Ysaye Barnwell 
  • Please, Baby, Please by Spike Lee and Tonya Lewis Lee 
  • David’s Drawings by Cathryn Falwell 
  • Charlie Parker Played Beebop by Chris Rashka 
  • This Jazz Man by Karen Ehhardt 
  • What A Beautiful World by Ashley Bryan 
  • My Daddy and I by Eloise Greenfield 
  • This Is The Rope by Jacqueline Woodson 
  • Faraway Home by Jane Kurtz 
  • A Chair for My Mother by Vera Williams 

 

Black Lives Matter at School Year of Purpose

Empathy - It's so important to think about how other people feel, because different people have different feelings. Sometimes it helps to think about how you would feel if the same thing that happened to your friend happened to you. Another way to say that is empathy

This month we continue our commitment to the Black Lives Matter at School Year of Purpose by discussing the principles loving engagement and empathy and recognizing the work that student activist, particularly Black student activists, have done and continue to do. At Hazel Wolf K-8 we embody and practice justice, liberation, and peace in our engagements with students, staff and community members. As educators we know the importance of talking about our feelings and understanding others, and we engage with our students and community with the intent to learn about and connect with each other through empathy.

Principle Definitions

Loving Engagement: Loving Engagement is the commitment to practice justice, liberation and peace.

Engagement - It's so important to make sure that we are always trying to be fair and peaceful, and to engage with other people (treat other people) with love. We have to keep practicing this so that we can get better and better at it. Another way to say that is loving engagement.

Kid Friendly: “It’s so important to make sure that we are always trying to be fair and peaceful, an
d to engage with other people (treat other people) with love. We have to keep practicing this so that we can get better and better at it. Another way to say that is loving engagement.”
Empathy: Empathy is one’s ability to connect with others by building relationships built on mutual trust and understanding. Kid Friendly: “It’s so important to think about how other people feel, because different people have different feelings. Sometimes it helps to think about how you would feel if the same thing that happened to your friend happened to you. Another way to say that is empathy.”

Unapologetically Black Resources* February 2021

Unapologetically Black

*Some of these resources may include some content not suitable for students this age- please make sure to review before posting anything for students.

Year of Purpose – January’s principal is Queer Affirming

Queer Affirming - We foster a queer - affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinkoing, or rahter, the belief that all in the world are hetersosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise).

Principle: Queer Affirming During January, we find it critical to lift up Bayard Rustin, one of the principal organizers behind the March on Washington which is crowned as one of MLK’s lasting achievements.

Year of Purpose Assemblies Wednesday, January 27th

MS 8:45, K-2 9:20, 3-5 10:15

To be queer-affirming means lifting up our queer ancestors who were at the foundation of our movements throughout time. This deepens the purpose of MLK day to understand that no one person makes a movement, highlighting how MLK’s legacy encompasses the contributions of many.

What is meant by the term “Queer Affirming”?
When we gather as community, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise).

Globalism - Globalism means that we are thinking about all the different people all over the world, and thinking about the ways to keep things fair everywhere.

Year of Purpose – December’s principle is Globalism and Collective Value

December 3 is International People’s with Disabilities Day. Harriet Tubman, Fannie Lou Hamer are two disabled freedom fighters we revere, even as the disabilities they carried with them into struggle aren’t consistently lifted up as assets in their fight. To fight against societal ableism, we must celebrate our differences and understand how the lessons from Black disabled organizers teach us how to build inclusive, accessible movements.

Gender Affinity – Remembering William Dorsey Swann

Swann was born into slavery. He was a slave in Hancock, Maryland and was freed by Union soldiers after the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect.

During the 1880s and 1890s, Swann organized a series of balls in Washington, D.C. He called himself the “queen of drag”. Most of the attendees of Swann’s gatherings were men who were formerly enslaved, and were gathering to dance in their satin and silk dresses. Because these events were secretive, invitations were often quietly made at places like the YMCA.

Swann was arrested in police raids numerous times, including in the first documented case of arrests for female impersonation in the United States, on April 12, 1888. In 1896, he was falsely convicted and sentenced to 10 months in jail for “keeping a disorderly house”, i.e., running a brothel. After his sentencing, he requested a pardon from President Grover Cleveland. This request was denied, but Swann was the first American on record who pursued legal and political action to defend the LGBTQ community’s right to gather.

Swann was known to have been close with Pierce Lafayette and Felix Hall, two men who had also both been enslaved and who formed the first known male same-sex relationship between enslaved Americans.

When Swann stopped organizing and participating in drag events, his brother continued to make costumes for the drag community. Two of his brothers had also been active participants in Swann’s drag balls. Read more about Swann on Wikipedia.

October Restorative Justice: Justice for George Day

We work vigorously for freedom and justice for black people and, by extension, all people. We intentionally build and nurture a beloved community that is bonded together through a beautiful struggle that is restorative, not depleting.